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Gaming Guru

Lee Section Eight
 

What We Do Matters

28 May 2011

I'm just returning from Sin City on a family trip, which happens about twice a year and is fun on its own accord. Funny thing about Las Vegas -- it never ceases to amaze me, teach me, and make me think to myself that everything we do matters.

When we meet in Vegas, my sister and her husband always call the shots on where we stay because they travel quite a bit on cruises and places where the national chain of casinos can be found. They have the elite of the player's cards that get them at the front of the line just about anywhere, park anywhere, and stay in suites that rival the square footage of my house. This time was no different and I think I can speak for the wife that we certainly approved of the suite we had.

We set out to play craps at several places and I was met with a common conversation about the throw, hitting the wall, and setting the dice.

At one place, after my first toss, the pit boss made conversation with me. I thought he was just trying to play some distraction techniques, and maybe he was, but it was the content of his comments that interested me. He did the usual, "Oh you're one of those guys," to which I innocently just respond, "Yes, I'm one of those guys."

"You guys come around a lot more these days. As long as you're hitting the back wall and don't take long to set the dice and get them off, I don't have a problem with you. A couple of people upstairs have some big time heartburn over several of your types."

I kept throwing, but intrigued about what he was saying, "Oh really, like what kind of heartburn?"

"There are people that come in here and act like they have a secret weapon, acting cocky, get argumentative, take a long time to set the dice and miss the back wall often. Those people are not welcome here. What really gets them are these people that claim to be dice controllers but we haven't seen them control dice enough to hit the back wall, which makes our crew laugh."

"They sometimes come in bunches and do what they call a 'table takeover'. We really do have a problem with that because we see only about four of them actually throw while the rest do this 'Count-5' thing that they think is saving them money. We end up getting their money in the long run, but our guys upstairs just do not want their action here because they take too long to set the dice and lots of them don't hit the back wall so it slows down the game."

I was still throwing; approaching a $150 6 and 8 on my place bet. My point was 5 and I had a one dollar tip with two dollars odds for the dealers. I was still listening to his comments, thinking at first that our guys are doing the right things and the pit boss is just fussing about it. This wasn't the case. He actually had a point.

If these people were Golden Touch students, they were not doing the right things. Golden Touch teaches a throw that requires you to hit the back wall each and every time as well as setting and tossing the dice in less than seven seconds.

This was not adding up. I was really hoping it wasn't GTC people, and then it hit me. It didn't matter. It didn't matter at all if it was GTC people or someone from another school of thought, or even someone that has merely attempted to figure a shot out for himself.

It didn't matter because, at this point in time, I was the only person that was making an example of "the throw." I was representing dice setters and what I was doing mattered. It would matter to the next guy who tries to throw long after me and the next and then the next dozen and so on.

It mattered enough that someone before me made an impression on this pit boss and his bosses upstairs. Unfortunately it mattered in a negative way and all it probably took was one person. Unfortunately, they were exposed to what seemed like quite a few incidents with people doing the wrong things -- simple things like hitting the back wall and setting the dice quickly. Something Golden Touch teaches in the first hour of the first day of the beginning class. We teach it to all students from moment one and repeat it throughout a student's learning experience.

Again I was wrong. I wasn't the only person this pit boss was exposed to. My sister, my brother-in-law, and my nephew all have some kind of neophyte throw going on. I was still throwing and listening to the pit bosses words when these thoughts were going through my head. I did need to make sure that my family would do the right things, because what I was going to say to them should be said to all new craps shooters.

  • Do not go to a live casino table if you are throwing short with a "pendulum throw" whether you were self-schooled, read a few books, took a class somewhere, or even if you know the dice gods themselves.
  • Do not go if you are not familiar enough with the dice that you fiddle with the dice to find your set.
  • Do not go if you cannot set the dice and throw them in under seven seconds.
  • Do not go if you cannot hit the back wall, which is about seven and a half to eight feet away from you.
  • Do not go with a chip on your shoulder, acting like you think you can beat the house with blindfolds on.
  • Do not go without tipping, no matter how. If you are new to tipping then you should not go until you work that into your practice so you do it without thinking about it.
  • Do not go without knowing what you are betting, how you are betting, what your winnings pay, and how you will progress. Again, practice this at home until you don't think about it. It should be automatic.
  • Do not go if you have to put your hands in the table area when someone else is throwing.
  • Do not go if you are unfamiliar with all of the etiquette associated with craps.

This may sound harsh to new students; it certainly sounded harsh when my family heard them later as they were readers of Frank's books. I hurried us all off after my first throw to tell them. I had to.

This is not just a journey of one. It is a journey of many and the needs of the many can certainly be affected by the actions of the one -- good and bad.

I ended up with never hitting my only point of 5, but had ten 6s and six 8s and dealers were on those numbers as well. I think I had them up to $18 each.

The pit boss summed up his first impression of my throw, "Good roll. You I have no problem with, your action is welcome here. Keep up the good work and as long as you're taking care of my crew like that, you can do anything you want. Just hit that back wall while you do it." He smiled and winked, then left.

What I did mattered.

Lee Section Eight
Lee "Section Eight" has been playing craps for almost two decades. He has put hundreds of thousands of hours of practice into being a consistent dice controller. In his private life, Section Eight is a Chief Information Officer of a global technology company and holds a Bachelors of Arts in Russian Linguistics. He’s been a translator and has worked in the intelligence community. Section Eight is a member of the West Coast Crew and frequents Vegas and has had multiple 30-roll hands. Section Eight is also a member of the 40-Roll Club and 50-Roll Club. In his time away from the tables, Section Eight has been seen on TV in such shows as Bones, In Case of Emergency, Grey’s Anatomy, and 24.
Lee Section Eight
Lee "Section Eight" has been playing craps for almost two decades. He has put hundreds of thousands of hours of practice into being a consistent dice controller. In his private life, Section Eight is a Chief Information Officer of a global technology company and holds a Bachelors of Arts in Russian Linguistics. He’s been a translator and has worked in the intelligence community. Section Eight is a member of the West Coast Crew and frequents Vegas and has had multiple 30-roll hands. Section Eight is also a member of the 40-Roll Club and 50-Roll Club. In his time away from the tables, Section Eight has been seen on TV in such shows as Bones, In Case of Emergency, Grey’s Anatomy, and 24.