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Best of Howard Stutz

Gaming Guru

Howard Stutz
 

Reappointment of Gaming Commission members confirmed

8 April 2013

LAS VEGAS -- Gov. Brian Sandoval will keep the five-member Nevada State Gaming Control Board Gaming Commission intact for another year.

Sandoval spokeswoman Mary-Sarah Kinner confirmed the governor has reappointed Las Vegas attorneys Joe Brown and John Moran Jr. to new four-year terms as members of the commission.

The terms of Brown and Moran will run through February 2017.

Brown has served on the commission since 2008 and is director of the law firm Fennemore Craig Jones Vargas.

During his career Brown has served as a member of boards for the Nevada Department of Wildlife and the Nevada State Athletic Commission.

Moran, who was originally appointed to the Gaming Commission in 2004, is a partner in the Moran Law Firm.

He has served as a member and chairman on the Colorado River Commission of Nevada and the Nevada Board of Wildlife Commissioners.

The part-time Gaming Commission acts on recommendations made by the Gaming Control Board, whose three members oversee Nevada’s $10.86 billion a year gaming industry.

Gaming commissioners are appointed by the governor and serve four-year terms. The chairman is paid $55,000 a year, and commissioners make $40,000 a year.

Sandoval reappointed Chairman Pete Bernhard in 2011 and commissioner Tony Alamo Jr. a year ago. Former State Sen. Randolph Townsend’s term as a commissioner expires next year.

In August 2011, the Review-Journal investigated the number of recusals for conflicts of interest by members of the Nevada Gaming Commission.

Between May 2009 and July 2011, Brown recused himself 175 times on matters coming before the commission, roughly 14 percent of all issues.

Moran had the second-highest number of recusals, with 16 instances during those months.