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Gaming Guru

Jumbotron Ron
 

Dice Control Changes the Game

11 September 2011

I know the game of craps like the back of my hand. I know all the odds, edges, and payouts like second nature, but how many times can you say the free odds bet does not have an edge and the 6/8 has a 1.52 percent edge?

Don't get me wrong, a good controlled throw and knowledge and application of the math of the game is what you need to beat the game. But dice control changes the game. What is a terrible bet for a random roller can be a great bet for a dice controller with great on-axis ability and pitch control.

Being able to call your shot not only makes you feel like The Babe but it can also be very profitable. Very few, I mean very few, ever get to this level. They have a program called SmartCraps that can prove mathematically whether they have the goods to make these kinds of bets.

A friend of mine and fellow writer Jerry "Stickman" has a picture perfect shot. That being said if you happen to catch Jerry on one of his legendary rolls where he is banging out hard 6 after hard 6, load up on the 6. It's a good bet. If you decide to also bet the hard 6 and also hop the hard 6, I would not say you were an idiot gambler who does not know the math of the game.

Now if you bet the same way on shake 'em up Charlie winging them down from the end of the table, I would say you are an idiot gambler who does not know the math of the game. Advantage players take advantage. If you catch a highly skilled dice controller on fire banging out his dice set, by all means take advantage.

After recently reading Frank Scoblete's new book, Cutting Edge Craps, Advanced Strategies for Serious Players I saw for my own eyes the mathematical proof of what I learned from experience. The data proved that a highly skilled, on-axis dice controller with superior pitch control has more of an edge hopping the hard six than he did over placing the six.

Atlantic City, New Jersey, July 4, 2005: I brought my own fireworks to the casino. I was down $700 over two days and four sessions and I just couldn't get anything going. I played disciplined for two days, but I could not turn the corner into the profit zone. I had $50 left that I could afford to lose (this was before I learned how important a dedicated bankroll strictly for gambling was). I made a $10 pass line and I hopped the hard 8 for $10. For those of you that don't know, a hopping bet is a one-roll bet that pays 30 to 1 for hardways and 15 to 1 for any other combination. You have one roll to hit whatever combination you bet on. I hopped the 4/4, which is a 1 in 36 chance that pays 30 to 1. A fair game would pay 35 to 1, so you can see that when you lose you lose and when you win you lose because you are not getting paid fairly. This is the casino's built-in edge. The edge on hopping the hard 8 is an abysmal 13.8% for a random roller.

A dice controller's skill is dynamic and a skilled dice controller can turn the tables on this bet and put the edge heavily in his favor. I have the edge on this bet. I worked hard to get it because six years ago in Atlantic City I saw just how powerful it could be.

I set the hardway set with the 4/4 on top. My grip was good, arm swing felt great, the dice rolled off my fingers on axis and floated through the air at a 45-degree angle until they rolled end over end gently hitting the back wall. The Stickman called it, "Eight the hardway, somebody must have E-S-P-N or whatever you call it." I was paid $300 for the hopping hard 8 bet and the 8 was now the point.

I was feeling courageous so I placed $50 odds behind the 8, I placed the six for $60, and I threw in another $50 to put on top of the $10 I already had on the hopping hard 8, $10 was piggy backed on top of my bet for the dealers. I did everything exactly the same as the first roll and bam, what do you know, another hard 8!

The pass line bet with odds paid $70; the hopping hard 8 bet paid $1500 to me and $300 to the dealers. Needless to say they were very happy. I went to $100 on the hopping hard 8 and $20 for the dealers. I just missed with a 4/5 on the third try. I went on fire for the next two days, having big rolls and hitting my share of hop bets.

The casino comped me dinners and a very nice room on a high floor with an ocean view. It turned out to be a great vacation, but more important it taught me how a highly skilled dice controller could change the game and make a boatload of cash in the process. I was very happy to read Mr. Scoblete's new book and to find out that the data proved my hypothesis. I knew it but it was gratifying to see the proof that I was right all along.

If any of my readers have any questions they would like to ask me, you can contact me at CrapsJumbotron@Gmail.com. Until next time, "Tell 'em Jumbotron Ron sent ya."

Jumbotron Ron
Known as Jumbotron Ron on the East and Nevada Ron on the West, he is a advantage dice controller who spends much of his time in the casinos playing with his team The Hitmen and various advantage players from Golden Touch Craps. Known for legendary rolls on both coast he has also been dubbed "Mr. Lucky" and the "Mayor" of the boardwalk by various casino personnel.
Jumbotron Ron
Known as Jumbotron Ron on the East and Nevada Ron on the West, he is a advantage dice controller who spends much of his time in the casinos playing with his team The Hitmen and various advantage players from Golden Touch Craps. Known for legendary rolls on both coast he has also been dubbed "Mr. Lucky" and the "Mayor" of the boardwalk by various casino personnel.